Zero Carbon Housing With Cedar Shingles

Zero carbon housing is becoming much more of an achievable goal as renewable energy products develop and new insulation techniques are found. However, it is not just the new products that can contribute to zero carbon housing, some old products can also help.

Cedar shingles have been around for centuries and are a traditional roofing material. If treated correctly cedar shingles will provide long lasting protection for your roof. Not only that, but they are easy to maintain and replace.

Cedar shingles can be used for a wide variety of projects, from traditional to modern and from barn conversions to large commercial projects, due to the aesthetic versatility of the product.

Due to the production, treatment and installation of cedar shingles, they can be truly classed as a zero carbon renewable material, that will benefit any eco-conscious build.

Cedar shingles are sourced from well-managed woodlands. By using timber from such woodlands, it helps to protect them which not only reduces carbon from the atmosphere, but also provides habitats for a wide range of flora and fauna. After the timber is harvested the shingles are produced by sawing the shingles away from a block of wood. This process requires a minimal amount of carbon.

At our saw mill in South Wales we produce cedar shingles from locally-sourced cedar and have provided the finished shingles to many local projects. This means that there is also a minimal carbon footprint for transporting the cedar.

When the lifespan of the cedar shingles comes to a close, they will naturally decompose, only releasing carbon that was already naturally in the current cycle, rather than carbon that was buried deep underground.

The natural insulation properties of cedar help to maintain an energy efficient building, again reducing the carbon footprint of the project.

Cedar shingles have been around for centuries, long before people were concerned about carbon emissions, but they are still proving to be an effective and popular roofing choice.

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